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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions and did so long people like barry gold water. early in his career he was a staunch advocate of unions in south carolina, back in the 30s and 40s, when the union vote was an important vote in south carolina, but he switches in the '50s and 60s and by 1970s becomes a die hard supporter of business against labor. then he also has an important roll in conservative evangelical politics. he joins the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does it to win votes, and the upcountry of south carolina. bob jones just moved to his university, and thurmond needed votes. lost the race to th
. >> congress authorizes spending. they order me to spend. they tell me you need to fund our defense department, at such and such a level. you need to send out social security checks. you need to make sure that you are paying to care for our veterans. they lay all of this out for me. and because they have the spending power. and so i am required by law to go ahead and pay these bills. separately, they also have to authorize the raising of the debt ceiling in order to make sure that those bills are paid. and so what congress can't do is tell me to spend x, and then say but we're not going to give you the authority to go ahead and pay the bills. >> the economist made a laundry list of what would happen if congressional republicans refused to raise the debt limit. failure to raise the debt ceiling would force immediate spending cuts equal for 6% of gdp. not only would that threaten to send the economy back into recession, it would also deprive many of money needed to meet their own obligations, setting off a chain reaction of defaults that could incite investors to dump their holdings, driving up
the defense industry, which is not to say that there aren't plenty of democrats whose bread is not being buttered by defense contractors, but if you look down at the breakdown of sequester cuts, defense gets hit with $55 billion in cuts, but they are much more severe, and as dave wood from the huffington post has said, it's like taking a meat clever to the defense industry. the nondefense cuts, 55 billion, same amount, but social security, retirement, veterans medicaid, snap, food stamps and jobless benefits are all exempt, steve. >> i think there's a sort of story here now that's been two years in the making where at some point this is going to have to come to a head. at some point president obama is going to have to call the bluff of the republicans. there were battles over continuing resolutions to fund the government in 2011. there was a summer of 2011 with the debt ceiling. there was the super committee. they were setting up the fiscal cliff. now we've got continuing resolution in march. now we've got the sequester, march 1st. now we've got debt ceiling all over again. one of these
it was a progressive vision for the country. at the same time with the exception of his defense of the social safety net, which is to say medicaid and social security, climate change used to be a bipartisan issue. immigration reform used to be a bipartisan issue. even gay rights is something where you have conservatives that support marriage equality. in the end substantively is it that much of a dramatic shift? >> with the exception of gay rights, there is very little that is significant in the obama agenda that could not have been proposed and was not proposed by moderate republicans in the late 1990s and early 2000's. newt gingrich sat on the couch. the health care plan is based off the 1993 bob dole and lincoln chafy health care plan, and you can go on and on down the list like that. that's what i thought was interesting to e.j.'s point. this was not really a speech about what obama wants to get done next. it was about making a philosophical case for what obama and america has already done. somewhat what i think is unusual is an enormous amount of it and -- >> already one day in. >> already unus
you in, that he owed it to you knowing you were going to come forth with that kind of defense to say maybe you shouldn't get out there so far? >> you know, i do. and i do, but at the end of the day, i'm not going to blame him. i'm going to blame myself. but, look, he's lance armstrong. what he wanted was the cover of "newsweek." he wanted a prominent -- someone prominent in the world of sports to come to his defense because as we all saw last night, lance is a clinical, classic narcissist who really only cares about himself. so he didn't care about me. he cared about getting what he could out of me, but, you know, journalists go through this all the time, and i bought it, and i'm embarrassed. >> dave, you wrote that what he's trying to do now is the equivalent of riding a bike through the eye of a needle. well, we watched half of it. we'll see the rest of it tonight perhaps. did he succeed? >> no, he didn't succeed at all, and he didn't succeed on either front, and that's the key point here is that he had to do two different things that were very different, very divergent, and he fai
on revenues. we can deal with the defense budget. but when you say whether we pay now or later but you're not talking about a delay. i went to public schools in brooklyn but now or later means delay. >> look at it this way. the amendment today, it would have cut defense something you and i have talked about before. 157 republicans voted for that. five democrats also voted for my amendment today. if the amendment had passed, the money would have gone to new york and new jersey just as quickly. again, this was not a debate about who gets the money, how much money it was. it was a debate how we're going to pay for it. make one thing clear. this is all borrowed money. this is not budgeted this year. we are going to borrow every penny we send to the northeast. i wanted to have the discussion of whether or not this was important enough to find some savings some place. give me something that we are willing to give up as a country. and if it's a national park in my state. show me something we're willing to give up as a country and share that sacrifice so these folks in the northeast get the ai
in chief trusts his secretary of defense, trusts his commanders. did you sense there was a deficit of trust between, say, you and the president early on? in afghanistan? >> if you think of any complex endeavor that you're a part of, and you're going to do it with a team of people, if you don't trust them at the outset, you're going to have to develop trust very quickly. >> and he never chose you in this case. do you think that's the issue? >> i think he was involved. i was chosen by secretary gates, and clearly approved by the president. so i wases his commander. i replaced general mckiran in june of 2010. i think, though, there are a number of things. i think people underestimate the difference between the cultures of the civilian culture and military culture. it's not an opposition. they are just different. so they use different words, different backgrounds. they have a different understanding sometimes of history. plus a new administration comes in, any new administration, doesn't matter which party. and they've got to form a team and they're trying to internally form a team and also try
not be so confused. "the constitutional right about guns is for self-defense and hunting. founders did not mean modern weapons of war." lining up the crazy is not a difficult task for the right wing these days. but this rhetoric and hysteria i think is very dangerous. there is no basis to call the president of the united states a tyrant or a dictator, and no president ever deserves to be compared to stalin or hitler. but of course it continues. it happened earlier this week. someone needs to be an adult in the room to tell them to cool it. you know? this is america. but abusing the first amendment really is not good. there is a responsibility when you're in front of a camera and you have a microphone. and if this is the way they want to use it, what do you think is going to happen? get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question, will republican leadership denounce this type of rhetoric? text a for yes. text b for no to 622639. you can go to our blog at ed.msnbc.com. we'll bring you the results later on in the show. i'm joined tonight by caryn finney, msnbc
defense of the big three. terry o'neill on a historic speech for women. jonathan alter and james peterson on the cultural impact of a president linking seneca falls, selma and stonewall. and my thoughts on a new hope for the american class. >> progress does not compel us to settle centuries long debates about the role of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time. >> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. this was a big deal. in the 57th formal inauguration of an american president, barack obama delivered one of the most progressive speeches ever given by a commander in chief. with more than a million people in attendance, the president took the ceremonial oath of office on the steps of the united states capitol. president obama did not set out to lower expectations of his second term. instead, he established the goals of a progressive agenda. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together. for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very we
phillips, dear abby, was 94 years old. >>> and manti te'o. a rare defensive player to become a heisman finalist known for his heartwarming triumph over tragedy after playing through the death of his girlfriend, or so we thought. now we learned it was all a hoax, but who was the victim here? what did notre dame know and when did the school know it about te'o. john yang is trying to unravel this mystery. john, what have you learned? >> well, it's one thing we have learned within the past hour, actually, is that we've learned that manti te'o is not here in south bend. is he in florida in bradenton, florida, at an nfl combine camp. this is where nfl prospects are being schooled in life in the nfl. ironically, including media relations. something he is going to get a real test in now. this whole story has really exploded on the internet yesterday when dead spin reported that they had looked for traces of his girlfriend, of this famous story that really define him and define the notre dame team this year in their undefeated season about his ill fated relationship with this young woman who ha
was going to win the heisman, man. >> he won every defensive award, best player on defense, second in the heisman, unheard of for a defensive player. and part of his story throughout the season was that in september of last year at the beginning of the season, his grandmother died, and then his girlfriend died within hours of each other. >> heartbreaking story. >> the reports range from an hour to a couple of days. >> you were watching and you cried. >> can i just say, my son, joey, said there's something wrong with this guy. he told me this months ago. >> joey is kind of wise. >> i was watching espn over the holidays. because alabama was on, the story. and they tell this story. and then i got a call the next morning. and it was like no, no, no! and i started tearing up. and i was like -- and then they showed him running onto the field. and i was, like, how did the guy do that the week after he found out that his grandmother and his girlfriend died, and then they went on to say he played for her the day they buried her, man. it was the most remarkable story. and i actually called j
member than from the enemy. but the department of defense and all the services have done little except a lot of lip service in terms of addressing this issue. >> is the second term a time we might see it? we have been hearing critique of the cabinet but weather the secretary of defense is a man or woman, as secretary of defense, we want that person addressing these questions. will we see a stronger motivation to address the questions of military sexual assault in the second term? >> i certainly hope so. we are having a hearing in congress this week where more than 41 young recruits, new trainees were sexually assaulted or harassed by 19 military training instructors. it wasn't because women came forward and talked about it. only one reported it. there's a fear of reporting it. if you report it, your career is over. >> is there something we can learn from sort of the culture of the military which is at this moment, managing poorly in some ways the influx of new women service members and what's going on in the u.s. house of representatives and the u.s. senate which are still dominated by
to do with medicare social security, defense spending, what we have to do with tax reform. these are the tough choices. >> for example republicans have to make tough choices on defense cuts. >> we've got to cut defense. >> our combined defense budget is more than all the other countries in the world. republicans have to step up. i agree with you, governor. we have to do so much more than what you say in order to bend that curve. we have to do that but we've got to talk about -- >> we do. >> we've got to talk about raising the eligibility ages. >> we should look at medicare and social security in terms of how we strengthen them and preserve them for future generations, not as a piggy bank to offset the irresponsible decision making of policymakers. >> we just want it to be sustainable, david. >> that's what i'm saying. >> i have to say, though david, it's ironic you say that when you guys removed how many billions $700 billion, from medicare, which by the way, would have been good to make medicare more solvent in the coming years. >> actually, it did make
talk about the statistics of firearms used in self-defense and those statistics actually can be quite compelling. >> lars, i just want to say to you. we may disagree on this we may not. as crazy as it may be, to me so much of this is about individual behavior. and they've taken the faith and they've taken the prayers out of our school system for many, many years. so much of this, lars, is about the impact on the kids of family breakup and no one wants to talk about family breakup. ben, i think -- >> can we talk about health care? >> you know family breakup, you month the faith, you know all this stuff play as role in this. you know this. >> that's where we need school counselors. we should have one counselor for every 250 kids. in this country it's now one in 500. part of what we saw in this it will make it easier for schools to get those counselors, easier for schools to get psychologists. what we know those types of be folks help us create the sort of bonded close knit school community that makes it possible. >> baloney. come on. larry, this is crazy. larry, do you think a cool coun
from rush limbaugh. he has taken a very strange twist in his defense of gun enthusiasts. he's now claiming that they are the martin luther kings in this civil rights fight. >> if a lot of african-americans back in the '60s had guns and the legal right to use them for self-defense, do you think they would have needed selma? if john lewis had had a gun, would he have been beat upside the head on the bridge? >> i have to tell you -- >> karen, listen, this is disgusting. first of all, it's not original -- >> rush is now -- it sounds like he's trying to be a member of the black panthers. this is ridiculous. >> well, there's that irony as well. but it's not original. he's taking it from the comments from the other right wing nut job who was talking about if slaves had guns. first of all, there are plenty of shotgun owners during the civil rights era, but to reduce john lewis' service to this country and the civil rights movement and the black experience and the overall american experience in this country to him getting beat upside the head is disgusting and offensive. this is a man who
it to you knowing you were going to come forth with that kind of defense to say maybe you shouldn't get out there is far? >> you know, i do. and i do, but at the end of the day i'm not going to blame him. i'm going to blame myself. but, look, he's lance armstrong. what he wanted was the cover of "newsweek." he wanted a prominent -- someone prominent in the world of sports to come to his defense because as we all saw last night, lance is a clinical classic narcissist who really only cares about himself. so he didn't care about me. he cared about getting what he could out of me but, you know, journalists go through this all the time and i bought it, and i'm embarrassed. >> dave, you wrote that what he's trying to do now is the equivalent of riding a bike through the eye of a needle. well, we watched half of it. we'll see the res of it tonight perhaps. did he succeed? >> no, he didn't succeed at all and he didn't succeed on either front and that's the key point here is that he had to do two different things that were very different. very divergent and he failed at both. this is what he had to
is under attack, from food particles and bacteria. try fixodent. it helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. >>> the inauguration comes on martin luther king day. 47 years since the death of doctor king. the first african-american president takes office for his second term. joining me in the studio, reverend jesse jackson, founder of the rainbow push coalition. a pleasure. >> thank you. >> thank you for being here. let's talk about dr. king and the perspective of what i said, 45 years since his death, but we have an african-american president for the second time taking office. give me your thautsds on that. >> there's immense pride in that. the fact is, for 244 years we were in slavery, the emancipation proclamation, jim crow, only free since 1966, from selma, alabama, really, to washingto
, but with the voices we lift in defense of our most ancient values and enduring ideals. let us each of us now embrace with solemn duty and awesome joy what is our lasting birthright. with common effort and common purpose, with passion and dedication, let us answer the call of history and carry into an uncertain future the precious light of freedom. thank you, god bless you, and may he forever bless these united states of america. >> we are the people, but it will take leadership to guide us to the more perfect union we desire. president obama today accepted the charge for four more years. get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think tonight. tonight's question, will the president's goals be achieved in his second term in office? text a for yes. text b for no, to 622639. you can always go to our blog at ed.machines ed.msnbc.com. we'll bring you the results later on in the show. joining me is congressman keith ellison of minnesota, who is part of the congressional progressive caucus. congressman, good to have you with us tonight. >> always great to be here, ed. >> we are made for this moment
-minute address, the president laid out a defense of liberalism, a forceful argument for progressive values. just as president reagan made the conservative movement mainstream in the '80s, this president wants to mainstream liberalism, to leave a center-left country as his political legacy. >> we have always understood that when times change, so must we. that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges. that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. >> the president took on conservative opponents, making this unmistakable reference to wisconsin congressman and republican vice presidential nominee, paul ryan, who called recipients of federal benefits takers during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> the commitments we make to each other, through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers, they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> obama became the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural add
of secretary of defense. he won the backing of two of the senate's strongest supporters of israel, chuck schumer of new york and barbara boxer of california will vote to approve hagel. but the top republican on the senate arms services committee says he and hagel have philosophical differences on the issues and he will not be supporting his fellow republican. >>> boeing's newest passenger jet, the 787 dreamliners have been grounded by japan's leading airlines. a dream liner was evacuated after it made an emergency landing today. a cockpit message showed battery problems, the latest in a series of issues including a battery fire and fuel leaks. japan airlines and alnipon suspended all of the dream liner flights today. the faa is monitoring the incidents. once safety checks are complete, the planes could be back in the air on thursday. >>> and now here's your first look at this morning's dish of "scrambled politics." during his first term, president obama held fewer news conferences than george w. bush or bill clinton. over four years the president held 79 such briefings, that is ten fewer
, on the capitol steps. bill russell, i'm sorry. thank you. now, in george stephanopoulos's defense, all tall people look alike to him. i see great chins, i don't know! still, for the rest of the morning, stephanopoulos did a very good job. we have venus and serena williams coming in. look at that, there's danny glover. the dazzling miss halle berry looking fine. look at that. there's general colin and bill russell. the crowd loves them! f >> oh, yeah, welcome back to "morning joe" live from washington d.c. we have a great crowd here. my gosh, jonathan capehart is still with us and joining us on the set, former white house press secretary, robert gibbs. he's not doing too well this morning. chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of andrea mitchell reports andrea mitchell and presidential historian, douglas franklin, author of "cronkite. this gentleman behind me, is he still here? he is right here. he is right here. he is not a republican. you might want to lose the bow tie then. misleading to me. >> all right. >> thank you very much. there you go. clarification. >> this business is not
to actually accomplish thing, james? >> i think there are a couple things. you take what the defense gives you as a president. obviously the economy to contend with, gun control. i think immigration will be able to get worked into this. i think the administration has the to sort of wrap its arms around the combination of what happens in life around the world and what they want to try to get done. when they overlap. i do believe this administration was interested in gun control or commonsense gun safety even without a newtown massacre. when they overlap, you have to push hard and use the political will of an administration to get things done. >> if you want to call it a honeymoon period, people say as long as two years and other mrs. cynical say we're going to give him 100 day, re-evaluate and see how much capital he has. >> i would give him act six to eight months to get things in congress. after that people will be starting to think about the midterm elections. even democrats will have to go back to their districts and -- if they cast too many votes that take risk for the president, they won'
they need to engage in self defense for their families or about hunters? you're saying this is the reason why everything has to stay the way it is and nothing can be negotiated. is it really working for the guys that are making the money, the manufacturers and any of the products that are threatened, in many ways, threaten their profits. this has nothing to do with regular people. even the gun owners are victimized here? >> right, if you're a gun owner, you're in no jeopardy of losing your gun or having it taken away. but if you're making munl selling high-capacity clips, then you may have a problem. the vast numbers of american people, including gun owners, are in favor of gun safety prevention. it's only these lunatics who don't want to have any limits on anything. and if you notice, al, whenever they promote a solution, armed guards in every school in america, it always circles back to them having mr guns out there. selling more guns. if there were armed guards in every school, they'd have more armed guards buying guns. >> and more bullets and the government would have to pay the money
. there are a number of women running defense agencies in this town that he could have chosen. the second was a woman michelle flournoy that he could have chosen. i believe we got to keep pressure on him. because i think this is really important. >> anybody you know that's equally qualified. name some people you know who are equally qualified to the people he named to the top jobs who are women? >> susan rice was. >> equally qualified as john kerry? >> i think so. >> fair enough. >> she was just one. michelle flournoy would have been. >> i think they were just pushing against kerry. against hagel. >> against hagel and be a con train to the president. >> one of the most important people in the president's inner circle in the first term was nancy-ann deparle. had it not been for her they wouldn't have passed the health care bill. she was absolutely indispensable. she's leaving, however. >> the great irony is nobody's more powerful in the inner circle than a woman. valerie jarrett. he's known her a long time. she was an executive in chicago. he knows her well. this is an argument we'll have in america a
of the economy. for example, former defense secretary robert gates has warned the rising -- he has warned of rising military costs for years. >> sharply rising health care costs are consuming an ever-larger share of this department. growing from 19 billion 234 in . >> military health care costs have gone up 300% in the past decade. 2012 was the first year since 1995 military personnel saw an increase in health care premiums. now, there are two things republicans love. the military and reducing the deficit. republican should be thrilled with the public option. how can you make a hundred billion dollar mistake? who's doing the math? will it save or won't it save? let's turn to the author of the bill, january schawowsky of illinois. >> i'm so happy that wendy is doing well. >> thank you. we appreciated your phone calls very much. congresswoman, the math? >> the estimate is it's $104 billion over 10 years. it saves the government money. in terms of the subsidies, in the exchanges, it would be one option that americans could choose the cost would be 5-7% less and it would be an anchor pulling
with the votes we cast but with the voices we lift in defense of our most ancient values and enduring ideas. >> you and i, president obama's inaugural speech was a call to action for all americans. but as he's been appealing to those outside of the beltway, his vice president has been working the inside game. playing the role of the ultimate politician has been a strategy and a relationship that's worked on winding down the war in iraq, on dealing with the fiscal cliff, on pushing for gun legislation. and it's one the president praised yesterday. >> to my vice president who has not only been an extraordinary partner but an extraordinary friend. >> that's the mutual admiration and respect that's been years in the making. whatever they're doing works for them and for the country. joining me now is jamal simmons and michelle cottle for the daily beast. she wrote an article, joe biden the listener. thank you both for joining me tonight. >> good to be here. >> thanks, rev. >> michelle, let me go to you first. what about this relationship works so well? >> very early on it was established that ma
with the prime minister, the defense minister, opposition leaders, business leaders and, finally, with president morsi, and all of us pressed our concern, our offense at the things he's alleged to have said a number of years ago. and he responded that he is not someone who harbors hatred or ill feeling towards judism or the jewish people, but the burden is on him to further explain and put in context not just his statements, but also his actions. egypt is a vital partner for the united states, we also discussed critical strategic issues, such as security in the sinai respect for the camp david peace accords with israel and the constructive role that we hope egypt can play in the region going forward, but, obviously, his statements and our grave concerns about them were at the outset of the meeting. the responses were satisfactory enough that we then went on to talk about some of the other vital regional strategic issues. >> now, the white house and the state department have both condemned what he said, so from my own experience, they would not have condemned what the president of egypt said if h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)